Long Melford has something for everyone visiting the village, from a magnificent historic church and two Tudor manor houses to an extensive country park with linked walks and cycle paths. Recently the independent Nethergate Brewery relocated to the south of the village and is well worth a visit.

Kentwell Hall

Kentwell Hall, one of England’s finest Tudor houses, developed in stages between about 1500 and 1578. The house is totally moated (one of the longest in the county) and is reached by two original bridges.

Kentwell presents an interesting mix of periods within what is still an essentially Tudor layout. The house is an example of an Elizabethan e-Plan manor house and was started in the reign of Henry VIII. Internally there has been some change, but Kentwell still retains its grandeur including the Great Hall with Minstrel’s Gallery.

Kentwell’s gardens and grounds extend to approx. 30 acres and are often described as “magical with a surprise around every corner”. Area’s not to be missed include the Walled Garden, England’s tallest Sculptured Cedar Tree and wildlife meadows.

Kentwell has a full calendar of Tudor re-creations, themed weekends, Opera and Cinema evenings.

Kentwell is a truly magical venue for a perfect day out.

Holy Trinity Church

Holy Trinity Church, Long Melford is one of the great Suffolk wool churches. It is widely acknowledged to be one of the most magnificent parish churches in the country.

Whereas documents reveal that there has been a church on this site for at least 1,000 years, the church was almost entirely re-built in the 15th century at a time of growing prosperity among the local cloth merchants.

The church has many panels of original medieval stained glass which is over 500 years old, including the Hare window which symbolizes the Holy Trinity.

Along with the church’s extensive history, there is also a theory by local historian Barry Wall that King Edmund’s remains might have been buried here! See the link to his article published in 2017.

There are a number of leaflets and books about the church and the stained glass available in the church gift shop, and it is also possible to arrange a church tour. Please visit the church website for more information.

Opening Times for Visitors
Winter Months (Nov – Feb): 10:00am – 4:00pm
Spring & Autumn: 10:00am – 5:00pm
Summer Months (May – Aug): 10:00am – 6:00pm

Long Melford Country Park

Melford Country Park is a 8.13 hectare site of grassland, deciduous woodland and flooded former gravel workings located on the Borley Road at the south of the village. The River Stour forms the western boundary of the park. Part of the park is a nature reserve, it has a beautiful walk through the woodland, lakes, grassland and along the river frontage. The park has a car park, toilet facilities, picnic tables and benches.

The Country Park is widely used by local people and those from further afield. Great for family strolls, walking the dog, a pleasant place for a picnic or a base for a ramble or cycle ride.

The park is on National Cycle Network route 13 and South Suffolk route A and just off the Valley Walk from Sudbury, a 2.5-mile beautiful hike. GR TL857 436.

The Country Park is owned by Long Melford Parish Council and managed by the volunteer community group, Long Melford Open Spaces.

Long Melford Heritage Centre

The Long Melford Heritage Centre opened in 2011 following the filming of the BBC’s “Great British Story” with presenters Michael Wood and Dr Carenza Lewis, the associated community Big Dig revealed many artefact’s from Long Melford’s Roman and Medieval past. The programme inspired two local amateur archaeologists, John Nunn and Rob Simpson, to set up the Heritage Centre and since then a willing band of volunteers run the Centre.

Open from April until November the Centre is open on Saturdays 10 am – 4 pm, Sundays 12 – 4 pm and Wednesday afternoons 2 – 4 pm; admission is free. The centre exhibits many photographic and artefact displays of bygone Long Melford, so pop in and see how the Village used to look in days gone by.

It is situated at the rear of the Village Memorial Hall in Chemists Lane (road access is opposite the Bull Hotel).

Melford Hall – National Trust

For almost five centuries the picturesque turrets of Melford Hall have dominated Long Melford’s village green. Devastated by fire in 1942, the house was nurtured back to life by the Hyde Parker family and it remains their much-loved family home to this day. The interior decoration and furnishings chart changing tastes and fashions over the centuries, but it is the stories of family life in Long Melford, from visits by their relation Beatrix Potter with her menagerie of animals, through to children sliding down the grand staircase on trays – that make this house more than just bricks and mortar.

For more information about Melford Hall, opening hours and up coming events please visit our website www.nationaltrust.org.uk/melfordhall